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Editorial

In the interest of Bhutan and India

What is the significance of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Bhutan? This is the question on the minds of those at home and others watching his second visit to the kingdom closely. Even as political pundits and media try to analyse the purpose of the visit, what is clear …

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In the right direction

About a decade ago, our policy makers recognised that technology was the answer to our rugged terrain. The idea was that a farmer need not walk half a day to the nearest office to get a permit to fell the tree in his orchard or get a permit for a …

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Looking to the future?

As in much else, the theme of Bhutan’s development journey has been the change. In the process, however, we have had to come to terms with the danger of losing our very value systems and identity that defined the sovereignty of our society. At times, the measures we employed to …

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The cost of wrong planning

Planned developments come with challenges of their own. The problem, of course, does not lie in the objectives of the development plans themselves; it is in the planning where we seem to flounder quite often. As a small economy with formidable physical barriers, failures could be there. But that does …

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Greater focus needed in agriculture

Agriculture, the mainstay of Bhutan’s economy, is under severe pressure today. In the few decades since the beginning of the planned development, the sector’s growth has been declining rapidly. In the more recent years, the sector’s contribution to the national economy has seen a dramatic fall—from 44 per cent to …

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Old wine in new bottle?

There is another attempt at employing our youth or making them employable. The new programme, Youth Engagement for Livelihood Programme ,or YELP, will engage unemployed youth, those who completed Class X or above. Employment programmes is the need of the hour. Unemployment is a big problem and it is worse …

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Making people pay for their crime

Many Bhutanese tend to believe that we live in a promiscuous society. Going by the increasing number of reports, we are not.  There are some weaknesses in our that needs to be fixed urgently. While sex is a casual topic; it is a problem when it is forced upon somebody. …

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Dealing with the bully

In the age of social media that is rapidly evolving, it might appear that we are constantly waking up to new realities, some of which are deeply disturbing. But then, thanks to social media, we are now empowered the more to dig deeper into some of the vices that we …

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Watching remote Dramtoe

Remote Dramtoe in Samtse is untouched by development and many other things including cable television. There are only three TV sets in the village of 104 households. They are living their life. It will soon change. There is pressure from the younger lot; some are saving money to buy one. …

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Avoid the herd mentality

There is almost a movement, on social media, to punish those involved in the Earn and Learn Programme and to bring back Sonam Tamang who is on ventilator in a hospital in Japan. The emotion can be understood. There are allegations that hundreds of youth sent to Japan were exploited …

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Of rights and responsibilities

Tsirang court’s judgement on the case involving the Election Commission of Bhutan and a Tsirang resident sends a message that could have a lasting impact on our democratic process.  To the ECB, it’s a reminder that election process is not just about pressing the button, but allowing people to participate …

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APA and the Prime Minister

In the last one week, the Prime Minister had reviewed annual performance agreement ministries and agencies signed with the government. What came out from most of the reviews was that it has to be reviewed. The performance agreement is a good idea to remind us of our priorities, especially to …

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The corrupt culture must stop

The news that 91 individuals were found to have been involved in fraudulent practices in relation to issuance of driving licences reflects professionalism, the lack of it rather, in the very officials from whom we expect the highest moral and professional standards. It appears that a syndicate of a sort was …

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