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Editorial

Broken promises 

The government has come under much flak for its claim of achieving most of its 25 pledges in 120 days. It claimed 11 pledges as achieved, 11 on track and three as unachieved. A closer look at these claims show that the government has exaggerated its achievements. All pledges it …

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Youth and crime

Escalating crime figures are an indictment of our society. Stats from the Royal Bhutan Police show that last year, the number of arrests touched 1,180. The trend is sad and worrying. What is more worrying is that our young people form the biggest number among those who commit crimes. Reading …

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Reviewing state-owned enterprises

Many economies bank on state-owned enterprises (SOE). They are important to those seeking economic development. The SOEs have become a topic of discussions in recent times. It is good that we are having a discourse on an important issue. We need more. The government has formed a task force to …

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When health workers leave

Much of what Bhutan has achieved in health care services is because of our health workers. While there is little appreciation to their service, there is uproar when healthcare facilities run short of health workers. In what was a desperate attempt, the national referral hospital last week issued a notification …

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Accelerating mother and child health

The government has finalised the programme that is aimed at safeguarding the health of vulnerable expecting mothers, mothers with newborns and their infants. It is detailed and strategised, clearing a lot of doubts and questions. Whatever it is called – breastfeeding allowance, maternity allowance, or accelerating mother and child health …

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Tell us like it is

Free nutritious lunch programme in all Bhutanese schools is still a far cry from reality. So, when the government declared last week that this pledge on foot of World Food Programme’s departure from the country had been achieved, the news was received with more than mere disbelief. Why the government …

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Recognition for humanising development 

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) honoured his Majesty The Druk Gyalpo with a Special Award of Recognition this week. The honour recognises His Majesty’s leadership in advancing human development and the wellbeing and happiness of the people of Bhutan. Having been a close partner in the country’s development for …

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Human development: Looking ahead

While some might argue that 10 years is too short a time to assess the merits and blessings of democracy in Bhutan, others find reasons to disagree. Looking from the development perspective, a decade is an awfully long time. The National Human Development Report (NHDR) that was launched early this …

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Rethinking development

As planners, policy makers and development partners meet in the capital to discuss Bhutan’s development, several aspects of Bhutan’s development journey are highlighted. The round table meeting has provided a forum for discourse to take stock of how far the country has come in terms of development and how far …

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Need to build safety-first culture

We are repeatedly reminded of the lack of safety standards at construction sites, yet we go on about ignoring even the basic requirements that we by law ought to meet at the workplaces. In case some of us have forgotten that there is something called Regulations on Occupational Health, Safety …

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Will the bark lead to bite?

There is a new idea to solve the ever-increasing stray dog problem. It will be addressed with waste management. From the everyday scene of stray dogs scavenging on waste, it makes perfect sense that stray and waste correlates. Without waste, there will be no stray dogs. How and when the …

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Violence against women

The International Women’s Day is observed to celebrate women’s social, economic, cultural and political achievements. The day also marks a call for accelerating gender parity. The findings of the study, the National Commission for Women and Children conducted, released on the Day, have nothing to celebrate. It says that at …

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The first 120 days 

The government has completed 120 days in office. While attending a series of orientations, meetings and pleasantries did take much of the new government’s time, the first four months did see some changes. The committee of secretaries was reconstituted. The pay commission was formed and the cut off point for …

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