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Editorial

A bureaucratic gridlock?

Stories of hardships facing the Bhutanese youth in Japan who went to that country under earn and learn programme remain entangled in uncertainties and renewed debates. While the government has announced that it has arranged with Bhutan Development Bank Ltd. to extend loan repayment time for the youth, the bank …

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Keep vagrant animals off the city roads

They are not everywhere all of the time, of course, but when they are free ranging on the city roads more often than not, allowing some flexibility to the standing rules or turning a blind eye to the problem should be a cause for concern. The thromde administration is either …

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Unfinished business

After getting accustomed to delayed projects, we have now begun to inaugurate incomplete projects. The new Gelephu drungkhag office in Umling and the Tsirang hospital were still under construction even as they were inaugurated last year. The recently inaugurated eco-friendly treatment plant in Hejo is also incomplete. While inaugurations for the …

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The consequences

There is none so deaf as those who will not hear and none so blind than those who will not see. It is both shocking and sad that even today we have among us some phenomenally blinkered deniers of climate change. But the reality of the blue planet fast nearing …

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Rising vehicle numbers: what options do we have?

Premise: As vehicle numbers continue to grow, leading to increasing congestion particularly in the bigger towns and cities, the country’s only recourse is to adopt and implement a highly integrated, efficient and sustainable urban public transport system. With increasing economic prosperity, vehicle import figures will continue to grow. In fact, …

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Gap between policy makers and academics

Most government decisions are based on intuition and assumptions and less on empirical research and evidence. While lamenting about the bureaucratic hurdles, our academicians, who juggle administrative works with research, point out that our policy-making process is deficient of research and evidence. Although a statement like this may require a …

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Resort to dignified and meaningful engagement

The recent war of words on facebook between the Chairman of the National Council and the Opposition Leader about the government’s decision to remove cut-off point for Class X and the debates the instant cause célèbre continue to elicit was the most sordid display of impetuousness of our elected leaders. …

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The Economics problem

With the country caught up in the cut-off point discussions, little attention was paid to the class XII results. The results were nothing new. Like always, our students recorded the worst performance in Economics and, as always, the issue did not get much attention. No study appears to have been …

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Dignify the jobs, there will be takers

The Opposition has said that the government must do more to create employment opportunities in the country. According to some approximations, more than 80,000 jobs will have to be created before the end of the 12th Plan. The Opposition’s argument is that the government’s pledge to create just 5,000 jobs …

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A new year, a new beginning

As the nation ushers in the new year, we reflect on year gone by and prepare for the year ahead. It was a year of change. It was a year of continuity. The country marked a decade of transition to democratic governance and witnessed empowered and matured electorate make their choice. …

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Society’s needs versus pledges

The government’s decision to remove the cut off point, while allaying the concerns of anxious students and parents has been received fairly well. While populist, the move is seen as progressive and in keeping with change. The government is vehement that investing in education and children is not a waste …

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Are we not getting our priorities wrong?

The possible removal of cut-off point for Class X prompted debate when Druk Nyamrup Tshogpa first spelled it as one of the party’s principal pledges. Educationists and policymakers were and are still divided on the issue that has raised more questions than answers. Education ministry juggling between keeping the cut-off mark and …

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Plastic ban must be taken seriously

Bhutan banned plastic bags on April 20,1999. It made headlines. Nearly twenty years on, though, we are still talking about the need to outlaw the use or sale of plastic carry bags, wrappers and homemade ice cream pouches. The National Environment Commission last week issued a notification to reinforce the …

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