thecitizen

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  • in reply to: Students at a crossroads without identity card #146399

    thecitizen
    Participant

    “Being said ‘no’ to by the country where I live; being said ‘no’ to by the country where I was born; being said ‘no’ to by the country where my parents are from; I feel I am nobody and don’t even know why I am living. Being stateless, i am always surrounded by a sense of worthlessness.”

    in reply to: citizenship:cronic as AIDS #145735

    thecitizen
    Participant

    Even if the crime committed for which we are denied our birth right are so heinous, we have served our sentence for last many decades. we are not asking the government because we came from some other country, we have our ancestral origin here. our fore fathers served this country as any other citizen, just because few family member must have shown their vested interest to revolt against the country, it is not ethical for a nation to punish their relative,after all offspring of same parents have different thinking which is beyond the control of others.
    we have no place to appeal our grievance, no one listens to us,not even the legal system , left to die with a slow poison.

    in reply to: citizenship:cronic as AIDS #144957

    thecitizen
    Participant

    Why the Government cannot segregate the people into Bhutanese and non-Bhutanese in the first place? How long the Government needs to confirm the citizenship status of those whose census is under review or under process? Is the last 25 years not enough to resolve this issue? Why it is protracted for so long? Is anybody benefitted out of it? Why the Home Ministry is always biased regarding the Census pending cases in spite of verifying all the required documents of the applicants? Is it healthy to deprive the innocents arbitrarily and make fun of their lives? Who knows how many thousands census case files are collecting dust in the Department of Civil Registration & Census, MoHCA since more than two decades? What not problems people might be facing just for want of legal restoration of the citizenship which got deleted overnight even without the prior knowledge of the individuals…Whose prerogative it is to delete the citizenship abruptly??

    in reply to: please remember us:we are still alive #140760

    thecitizen
    Participant

    Hello. I think I am depressed. I feel like there is no point in my life anymore. I want out. I cry myself to sleep because I’m scared and I hate the world I live in. I am sick and tired of my crappy life…. I am depressed. Can you give me some tips not to be depressed?, all because i am stateless in my own country.

    in reply to: census: one pressing issue, why nothing is happening? #100546

    thecitizen
    Participant

    it is completely useless writing in this forum, it is completely useless appealing authority, everyone turns you a deaf ear, only thing i see is curse the god for creating you, i guess mercy is just a word in the dictionary. for everybody knows that we are the innocent victim we did not see what happened in country our past and for what we are punished.
    so leading a life at a dead end.

    in reply to: Government must do something to solve census problem #90400

    thecitizen
    Participant

    The inability to gain nationality can be a major obstacle in realizing even the most basic of human rights. For example, all citizens of a certain age are required to hold a valid state-issued identification card which is necessary for accessing a number of social benefits. The application for the card requires documents that a stateless or legally invisible person is unlikely to possess, such as birth certificate and proof of citizenship. Without this card or other forms of identification, living a normal life is difficult. Without citizenship people are denied access to “housing, formal employment, financial services social security, justice, property rights, legal marriage, and participation in the democratic process.” And of course, without a passport, individuals are also restricted in their freedom of movement
    The repercussions also extend to democracy and public safety. Without identification, a significant portion of the population cannot vote or be elected to public office. Further, they are far more vulnerable to practices such as human trafficking and child prostitution. Without official proof of age they may also be at risk for child labor and early marriage. And more generally, without identification the government at every level cannot keep track of this population, or take precautions to ensure their safety. And, when parents are stateless, they are far more likely to pass this status down to their children, since identification is required to register birth and paternity in many cases.

    So in sum, not having CID means being paralyzed- unable to access your rights and improve your life- and, like a communicable disease, you have to watch your children go through the same frustrating process without being able to help.

    in reply to: Earnest Request to DPT Government #44343

    thecitizen
    Participant

    time has to be given,it is a national issue, enough time must be given, but when we say time how long would be an adequate time, already 23 years of time is gone, the people suffering have submitted all the per-requisite documents,and bunch of file is prepared,to prove the authenticity of the documents it is being verified by the geog and chiwog.
    further what is left is to decide who deserve and who does not.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)