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Kushuthara – A Pattern of Love

The film about a relationship that transcends death and endures in another lifetime

Review: Based on a tragic story of a young village girl, who falls in love with a stranger, who fails to keep his promise to return to her, Kushuthara – A Pattern of Love tells the story about the rebirth of this love.

Directed by Karma Deki, the feature film was premiered during the Bhutan International Festival on February 14 in Thimphu.

Shot in Minjey gewog in Lhuentse, the film brings out the culture of weaving the intricate pattern textile called Kushuthara, considered the finest fabric, and a prized wedding garment, in the country.

One of the skilled weavers in Minjey is Chokimo (Kezang Wangmo), who catches the eye of Charlie (Emrhys Cooper.)

Charlie, a photojournalist from the US, is on an assignment to document traditional textile production in Lhuentse, when he first meets Chokimo.  Charlie gets a strange feeling that he has been in this place before and feels drawn to her.

Chokimo is married to Bumpala (Bumpa), who is a farmer in the village.

Chokimo has memories of the past life, and soon she reveals these memories to Charlie, entangling them through a series of events, unfolding their journey and story of the film.

The film explores the Buddhist concept of karma and rebirth of two individuals in this lifetime, to accomplish what was left incomplete in their previous lifetime.

Shot in January 2013, the film was screened in various international film festivals across Asia and Europe.

The film is a story that reflects many of my own life experiences, Karma Deki said. “It’s a story that is from the fabric of my own culture, a story from my heart.”

Karma Deki hopes the film will give international audiences an opportunity to get a glimpse at life and love in a remote village in one of the more secluded cultures of the world.

The first version of Kushuthara was released in 2007, highlighting the aspects of traditional culture by focusing on weaving.

“On the surface, it’s a typical boy-meets-girl theme, but it’s a story about how one single thread weaves the past and present lives of two people,” Karma Deki said.

The 1 hour-32 minute film is shown in Blu-ray HD format and presented in Dzongkha with English subtitles.  Bhutan Infotainment produced the film.

By Thinley Zangmo

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